North Buckhead Weather

USGS Weather station on Nancy Creek near Rickenbacker Drive

Rainfall and creek water quality information selections

Rainfall for the last week
Rainfall for last 31 days

Creek gage height (flood stage) for the last week
Creek gage height (flood stage) for last 31 days

All Weather station statistics for the last week
All Weather station statistics for last 31 days

NEW 1/18/08 USGS Weather station at Buford Dam

Reservoir water height at Buford Dam (ultimate source of Atlanta's water supply)

The following pages show the water height above sea level for Lake Lanier.  According to a NOAA web site, the full summer level is 1071 feet and the flood level is 1085 feet.
Water height for last 31 days
Water height for last 1 day
Related article from 9/2007

Map of Current Drought Conditions in Georgia

The following site shows drought conditions based on 7-day average stream flow as compared to historical averages.
County-by county map of drought conditions in Georgia

 

But Did It Rain Here?
From the North Buckhead Newsletter, July 2007

We have a bad drought and water is being rationed, at least for outside use.  It is the weekend and you wonder if you really need to get out and water your grass and plants.   The TV said the airport and other parts of town got rain recently, but did it rain here? 

Did you know that North Buckhead has its own miniweather station, accessible from the Internet?  The weather station is located in the Blue Heron Nature Preserve by Nancy Creek, near the Rickenbacker Drive bridge.  It’s run by the US Geological Service  and is funded by the City.  We link to it from our web site at www.nbca.org/weather.

The site is updated every hour or so and provides up to 31 days of data for several water quality-related statistics, two of which are very useful to residents.  Unfortunately, air temperature is not included.

But for drought-worried residents, local precipitation, measured to the nearest 1/100th of an inch, is important.  See the example below of a eight-day precipitation graph from the web site below.  If you look carefully you can see each rain event: 1/5” on July 1, a tiny amount on July 3 and 3/4” during the morning of July 8.

The other valuable statistic is “Gage height, feet”, which in plain English means “how high did Nancy Creek get?”  The graph below shows the gage height for the same eight-day period in July.  Note the creek rose late on July 6 even though we had no rain — it must have rained upstream in DeKalb County.

We think many will find this site interesting and valuable.  We suggest that you add NBCA’s weather page to your browser’s bookmarks (favorites) list.  Then you will be able to find out the answer to the question quickly, “But did it rain here?”